The Journal of Humanities & Social Sciences

1) Volume XXI, No 1, 2013 (April)
Author(s):Chief Editor Mujib Rahman, PhD (Edinburgh) Dean, Faculty of Arts & Humanities/ Department of English & Applied Linguistics University of Peshawar Editor Rubina Rahman, MSc (Edinburgh), PhD (Pesh

Abstract :

Guidelines for Contributors The Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Peshawar, a peerreviewed journal, published three times a year (April, August, and December), invites research papers for consideration for publication in the field of social sciences and humanities. Manuscripts (a softcopy on a CD, and two doublespaced hardcopies) should not exceed 7000 words (including endnotes and references) plus an informative abstract (200 words maximum), and should be accompanied by a crossed cheque of Rs. 3000 (Pak Rupees three thousand only) payable to “the Editor, JHSS.” Papers should be composed in MS Word, Times New Roman, and Font Size 11. Figures, tables, graphs (if any) should not be out of the margins of the text of the paper (13cm). Quotations in languages other than English must be translated in the body of the paper, and accompanied by the original in the endnotes. The author’s name, title/designation, e-mail and mailing addresses and institutional affiliation should appear on a separate title page. The Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences will consider one single-authored (as principle author) and one co-authored (as second/third author) by the same author for publication per number. The maximum acceptable number of coauthors is three! The Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences follows a variant of APA/MLA styles to accommodate the multi-disciplinarian work that the journal features. References must indicate full name(
2) The Fear of Alienation in Pride and Prejudice
Author(s):Samina Ashfaq, Nasir Jamal Khattak

Abstract :

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice reflects the attitude of the nineteenth century society yet its implications are obvious to the present times as well. The desires, hopes, fears, and social psyche of a society are reflected in the socially acceptable or unacceptable principles and practices of a society, and the way the members of the society perceive these principles and practices. The confusion between the socially acceptable and individually desirable exists in all societies. Sometimes it comes into conflict with each other in the form of social issues that can be peacefully resolved only through tolerance and understanding. For this, one has to evaluate oneself and learn about the deeper realities of life by interacting with others and developing a sympathetic understanding of how the others approach life. Class differences have to be resolved, suffering of the others has to be shared and one must step down from their high pedestal so as to understand the others around them.
3) The Penelopiad : A Postmodern Fiction
Author(s):Saman Khalid, Irshad Ahmad Tabassum

Abstract :

Postmodernism is commonly described as incredulity towards metanarratives. A metanarrative is an abstract idea that is thought to be a comprehensive explanation of historical experience or knowledge. It claims to arrive at a single universal truth. But postmodernism undercuts this holistic stance by establishing alternative possibilities for construction of truth. The word ‚parody‛ is still tainted with eighteenth century notion of wit and ridicule but coming out of such period limited definitions, parody in postmodern texts can mean witty ridicule as well as intertextuality or ironic quotation. The article analyses Margaret Atwood’s novella The Penelopiad, exploring the postmodern conventions of historiographic metafiction and parody. Employing her tongue-in-cheek humour and featuring two centres of consciousness, Atwood subverts the Homeric omniscient narrator. Resurrecting the mysteriously veiled figure of Penelope, Odysseus’s wife, who is known for her nobility and constancy, Atwood gives Penelope the narrative voice, telling a widely different tale from the Homeric version.
4) Structural Case Assignment in Pashto Unaccusatives
Author(s):Talat Masood, Mujib Rahman

Abstract :

This paper is an effort to explore the assignment of structural/abstract Case in Pashto unaccusative constructions from a minimalist perspective. A three pronged approach is adopted in this paper: one, it takes the minimalist hypothesis that ϕ- features agreement between a functional category/ head and a relevant nominal results in assigning structural Case to that nominal as its starting point and applies the same to Pashto constructions in the present, past, and future tenses; two, as so far no structures have been suggested for Pashto unaccusative constructions, therefore, this paper suggests three structures/ derivations for unaccusative Pashto verbs in the three Pashto tenses; three, for Pashto unaccusative constructions this paper hypothesizes that ϕ-features agreement between T and the relevant nominal results in assigning nominative Case to that nominal and ϕ-features agreement between ʋ or Voice functional category and the relevant nominal results in assigning accusative Case to that nominal. These three strands are put together and the output is evaluated and tested at the touch stone of different Pashto examples taken from a wide spectrum of daily life.
5) Antic Disposition: Hamlet in the Light of Cooperative Principle
Author(s):Rubina Rahman, Sameera Abbas

Abstract :

This paper is an attempt to analyse an extract from Shakespeare’s ‚Hamlet‛ in terms of Grice’s cooperative principle. The extract is selected from Act II/ii, ll.170- 219, which consists of a conversation between Hamlet and Polonius. Discourse analysis is the analysis of language in use. A discourse analyst looks at language in its context and describes it in terms of its purpose and functions in human affairs. In other words the main focus of a discourse analyst is ‘context, text and function’ (Cutting, 2002:2). The cooperative principle enables the speaker and the listener to convey and interpret the implications of an apparently metaphorical utterance (Grice, 1975). Cutting (2002: 34-5) has discussed the four maxims of the cooperative principle as proposed by Grice (1975), which might be observed or flouted by participants according to their purpose. By flouting a maxim, the speaker conveys more than what is said through ‘implicature’. The selected extract from Hamlet has been analysed using the principles of cooperation and implicature. Hamlets speech in the selected extract can be treated as an explicit example of the violation of the four maxims of the cooperative principle. It is concluded that Hamlet accomplishes his purpose of putting on an ‚antic disposition‛ by flouting the four maxims of the cooperative principle.
6) The Strain of Romanticism in the Poetry of T.S. Eliot
Author(s):S. M. A. Rauf

Abstract :

In many of his critical writings, T.S .Eliot claims to be a votary of classicism. This claim notwithstanding, there are strains of romanticism in his poetry as well as in his essays. The present study is directed to highlight this ambivalence with reference to Eliot’s critical essays as well as his poetry. The terms ‘classicism’ and ‘romanticism’ are too frequently used in the study of literature. There is also a tradition to classify certain periods in the history of English literature as Classical or Romantic. This classification is misleading because no period or poet can claim to be wholly in the tradition of classicism or romanticism. They are two different tendencies which are simultaneously traceable in the writings of an artist, though not in equal proportion. Eliot’s leanings towards romanticism are manifest in all his poems, especially in Four Quartets.
7) Traits of Modernist Feminism in Eustacia Vye's Quest for Self
Author(s):Shazia Ghulam Mohammad, Abdus Salam Khalis

Abstract :

Eustacia Vye in The Return of the Native is one of Thomas Hardy’s most memorable female characters. Though majority of Hardy’s critics place her at par with Bathsheba Everdene and Elfride Swancourte, some do not hesitate to compare her with the monumental Tess and the unparalleled Sue Bridehead. Notwithstanding any controversy about her generic status among Hardy’s characters, Eustacia’s queer nature offers a fascinating case for aesthetic cum psychoanalytical exposition. As an impulsive being with unparalleled emotional sensibilities, she derives a great part of her personality from her setting and environment — the romantically gothic Egdon Heath. Though set in a Victorian frame, she anticipates the emotionally assertive woman of modern era. This paper aims at exploring her unique psychological constituents, as the seeds and roots of her spiritual convictions and emotional adventures, projecting her as anticipating the modernistic woman both in life and literature.
8) Flood (2010) Effects on Agriculture, Livestock, Infrastructure and Human Health: A Case Study of Charsadda District
Author(s):Saeeda Yousaf, Sabawoona, Sumiya Naveed

Abstract :

This study was conducted to evaluate the main causes and damages of flood (2010) in district Charsadda. Most of the villages in Charsadda District are prone to floods during summer mainly because of torrential rainfall, melting of snow and ice, deforestation and over grazing in the catchment areas of rivers flowing across Charsadda. Overflowing the natural levees, the 2010 flood caused tremendous damages to houses, agriculture, standing crops and other infrastructures. The houses were damaged and resulted the displacement of 5500 families. All governmental and private health facilities and water supply schemes were damaged completely. Based on the study findings, it is recommended that flood relief channels and embankments should be improved along with the active flood areas to minimize the flood hazards.
9) Development Paradigm Revisited: A Few Anthropological Considerations
Author(s):Abid Ghafoor Chaudhry, Hafeez ur Rahman Chaudhry

Abstract :

The aim of this paper is to ponder over the term, ‘development’, as a concept with regard to the Third World countries, especially, in relation to Pakistan. Traditionally and historically, the debate on ‘development’ has ignored local or indigenous perspectives usually dubbed as ‘backward’, ‘traditional’, ‘obsolete’, and ‘out-dated.’ The authors are of the view that development as a concept has been misused to subjugate as well as subordinate the third world nations in order to extend colonial agenda. This was done deliberately to make local populations of the third world countries, like Pakistan, to shun their indigenous intellectual heritage. The paper is an attempt to generate a scholastic debate and exchange of professional views upon the development direction as required by countries like Pakistan. In addition, the paper builds an anthropological case to include the socio-cultural factors in order to revisit the development paradigm to suit the unique cultural perspective of the nation.

Volume No. XXI

Issue No. 1

April