The Journal of Humanities & Social Sciences

1) Volume XX, No 1, 2012
Author(s):Editor Mujib Rahman, PhD (Edinburgh) Department of English & Applied Linguistics University of Peshawar Office Secretary Muhammad Altaf

Abstract :

The Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Faculty of Arts and Humanities, University of Peshawar, Peshawar, 25120, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan
2) Faculty of Arts and Humanities University of Peshawar
Author(s):Editor Mujib Rahman, PhD (Edinburgh)

Abstract :

The Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences (JHSS), a refereed and internationally indexed journal recognised by the HEC, is published biannually by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, University of Peshawar, with the approval of the competent authority. No part of the material published in this journal be reproduced, reprinted, or copied without the prior permission of the editor.
3) The British Politico-Legal Structure and Police Accountability: A Critical Appraisal
Author(s):Basharat Hussain, Amirzada Asad Institute of Social Work, Sociology & Gender Studies, University of Peshawar, Pakistan

Abstract :

Police has a very important role to play in a society. Broadly, the police are responsible to prevent and control any conduct or action that is recognized as threatening to life and property in order to create and maintain a feeling of security in communities. However, police is often criticized for their excessive use of force, lack of accountability, political interference, corruption, and abuse of power. It becomes, therefore, important to keep a constant check on the police so as to avoid any abuse of powers by the police force as well as raising awareness among the citizens about their rights vis-à-vis the police This requires a legal framework which ensures the proper accountability of the police force. In this paper, we critically look at the complex structure of the tripartite system of police accountability in England and Wales and put forward some suggestions to improve the system so as to build a police that is more accountable.
4) The Process of Judicial Appointments in Pakistan under the 1973 Constitution
Author(s):Anees Iqbal Law College, University of Peshawar, Pakistan

Abstract :

The process of the appointment of judges of the superior judiciary has been the subject of great interest in Pakistan. In the Al-Jihad trust case (1996), the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the constitutional provisions resulted in the power of appointment fall into the hands of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Pakistan. This did not go well with the legislature and the executive, since they were left with no meaningful role in such appointments. The political setup established after the general elections gave a new facet to the process of appointment by adding Article 175A in the Constitution with the objective of balancing the role of the executive and the judiciary in such appointments. The purpose of this paper is to analyse and critically evaluate constitutional provisions relating to the process of judicial appointments before the Eighteenth Amendment, and the reasons for altering the process under Eighteenth Amendment in the light of the Supreme Court judgments.
5) Gendered Voices: Human Rights and Literary Discourse You don’t speak Pukhto [Pashto]; you do Pukhto.—Pashto proverb1
Author(s):Anoosh Khan Institute of Social Work, Sociology and Gender Studies, University of Peshawar, Pakistan

Abstract :

This paper analyses whether Pakhtun culture shapes discourse and gender identities or discourse and gender identities shape Pakhtun culture. The paper begins with the definition of culture and discourse that I use in this paper. The respondents’ answers are based on literary and human rights discourse, highlighting the cultural impact on literature and subsequently their understanding of human rights. In my findings the linguistic markers present in all respondents’ discourse include usage of evaluative clauses, agency, moral geography, linguistic gender markers, “I” →“you”/“we” and “you” →“we” transitions, lamination/voices and code-switching. I analyze these linguistic findings by following theoretical paradigms explicated by Althusser (1971), Pêcheux (1982), and Leap (2003). Thus, concluding that Pakhtun culture primarily shapes discourse and gender roles.
6) Wilde’s Fairy Tales: A Morphological Analysis of “The Young King” and “The Happy Prince”
Author(s):Rubina Rahman & Mujib Rahman Department of English & Applied Linguistics, University of Peshawar, Pakistan

Abstract :

Oscar Wide is eminent literary figure known predominantly for his immortal plays and his brilliant wit. His fairy tales remained in relative obscurity. A surge of literary investigation of has arisen with recent interest in his fairy tales from various perspectives. This paper examines the structure of Oscar Wilde’s fairy tales. For this purpose Vladimir Propp’s morphological model is taken as tool of investigation. Any ambiguities found are pointed out. The aim is to establish their structural proximity to the fairy tale text type.
7) The Darkest Pit:1 The Shadow in Wordsworth’s Poetry
Author(s):Mushtaq ur Rehman a, Nasir Jamal Khattak b a Department of English, Gomal University, D. I. Khan, Pakistan b Department of English & Applied Linguistics, University of Peshawar, Pakistan

Abstract :

This paper reads Wordsworth’s poetry from a Jungian point of view, and asserts that Wordsworth’s poetry focuses on the unconscious and its contents. Turning one’s back on the unconscious leads to the development of the shadow. We also contend that Wordsworth seems to urge his reader to turn to the unconscious in order to integrate the shadow into the conscious—something which helps us have a more productive, empathic, and healthy life on individual level and more tolerant, understanding, and peaceful life on collective level.
8) The Craving for an Identity in Meatless Days
Author(s):Najma Sahera, Atteq ur Rahmanb aHigher Education Department, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan bDepartment of English, Islamia College University, Peshawar, Pakistan

Abstract :

Postcolonial literature is an increasingly rich area of study in the new world scenario when the East and the West are trying more than ever to get closer across apparently insurmountable rifts. The trans-national muddled voices of the colonized states are to be heard distinctly now in English literature, more than ever, pointing at the widening gap between the margin and the centre. The English language, which is the largest legacy of colonization, is made to voice the predicament of the postcolonial experience. The severe feeling of inadequacy and estrangement, resulting in a loss of identity, is one of the prominent issues being addressed in the postcolonial literature. Sara Suleri in her Meatless Days boldly delineates the discomforts and inadequacies of belonging to and living in two cultures at the same time. Though Suleri’s father was a renowned Pakistani journalist and her mother was Welsh, still she could not help the feeling of being lost somewhere between the margin and the imperial centre.
9) Femaling Males: Anthropological Analysis of the Transgender Community in Pakistan
Author(s):Aneela Sultana, Muhammad Khan Kalyani Department of Anthropology, Quid-I-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan

Abstract :

There is a widespread belief in Pakistani society that hijras or khusras1 are the people born with ambiguous genitals medically termed as hermaphrodites. Most people think that born as hijra refers to an organic condition; but contrary to this myth, in most cases, becoming a hijra is one’s own conscious attempt driving out of psychological and organic etiology. In this regard, we conducted an interesting anthropological study in Dera Ghazi Khan, Punjab. We selected ninety-one different types of transgender for in-depth interviews and case studies from six deras2 from Ghanta Ghur Gol Bagh and its surroundings. We discovered several factors that persuade one to join the hijra community; they include a passion, a desire to express their feminine identity more explicitly, poor economic conditions and, above all, to live a carefree life. The hijras who are born intersexed have the highest status as this condition is rare in humans. Interestingly, in a sample of 91, only three were real hijras or khawaja sira, 57 were zenanas3 in the guise of hijras and 31 were nirban4. The study reveals that becoming a hijra entails many material and psychological advantages. As a career, it provides them opportunity to earn easy money through vadhai5, dance performance at disco bands, circus and prostitution. On the other hand it gives them personal autonomy and provides them excuse to win public sympathy. Their traditional role depends upon their individual talent, ability to face hostility an

Volume No. XX

Issue No. 1

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