The Journal of Humanities & Social Sciences

1) Volume XXIV, No 2, 2016
Author(s):Editor Nasir Jamal Khattak, PhD (Amherst) Department of English & Applied Linguistics University of Peshawar Office Secretary Muhammad Altaf

Abstract :

Guidelines for Contributors The Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Peshawar, a peer-reviewed journal, invites papers in the field of social sciences, humanities, business and management, and journalism. Manuscripts (a softcopy on a CD, and two double-spaced hardcopies) should not exceed 7000 words (including endnotes and references) with an informative abstract (250 words maximum), and a crossed cheque of Rs. 3000 (Pak Rupees three thousand only; non-refundable) payable to “the Editor, JHSS.” They should be composed in MS Word, Times New Roman, and Font Size 12. Figures, tables, graphs (if any) should not be out of the margins of the text of the paper. Quotations in languages other than English must be translated in the body of the paper, and accompanied by the original in the endnotes. The author’s name, title/designation, e-mail and mailing addresses and institutional affiliation should appear on a separate title page. It is also important that you carefully proofread your paper, and that it is accompanied by a Turnitin similarity index report in soft form. JHSS will also check submissions for plagiarism. The Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences consider one single-authored (as principle author) and one co-authored (must not exceed two) by the same author for publication per number. The Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences follows a variant of APA/MLA styles to accommodate the multi-disciplinarian work that the journal features. Refe
2) THE JOURNAL OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Author(s):Editor Nasir Jamal Khattak, PhD (Amherst)

Abstract :

The Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences (JHSS), a refereed and internationally indexed journal recognised by the HEC, is published biannually by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, University of Peshawar, with the approval of the competent authority. No part of the material published in this journal be reproduced, reprinted, or copied without the prior permission of the editor.
3) Issues and Perspectives in Decentralisation: Challenges in Democratic Transitions and Local Governance in Global South
Author(s):Aamer Taj Institute of Management Sciences Peshawar, Pakistan Waseef Jamal Institute of Management Sciences Peshawar, Pakistan & Shahwali Khan Institute of Management Sciences Peshawar, Pakis

Abstract :

This paper is about decentralisation as a process and the prospects for developing effective local governments in post-colonial societies of Global South. It reviews the issues that hinder the efficacy of decentralised governments and challenges faced in democratic transitions. Discourse in this paper analyses commonalities of issues such as local government representatives’ lack of managerial skills; insufficient delegation of official authority to the local governments; sporadic and ad hoc implementation of reforms; demographic heterogeneity; elite capture of local resources; matters of fiscal autonomy; shortage of public funds; dearth of support from the national and regional governments; and lack of technical support from civil bureaucracy. It is argued that societies in post-colonial states tend to remain apolitical and ‘Not So Civil’ as a consequence of military regimes. Problems pertaining to inter-institutional relationships and corruption in localised governance setup are also discussed as major hurdles.
4) 21 Fighting Polio: Why Radio Dramas Failed in Pakistan?
Author(s):Altaf Ullah Khan Department of Journalism & Mass Communication University of Peshawar, Peshawar, Pakistan Faizullah Jan Department of Journalism & Mass Communication University of Peshawar, Pesha

Abstract :

Entertainment Education strategies have been successfully used in health campaigns for the prevention of different diseases across the globe, especially in the under-developed countries. Radio drama is an important instrument of the Entertainment Education strategies. Radio dramas have been used in successful health campaigns in Africa and Asia. Radio dramas have been particularly successful in targeting the underprivileged population. Deutsche Welle (DW), the German international broadcaster, keeping in mind the effectiveness of radio dramas in bringing social change, introduced this genre of drama in Pakistan in 2012. The radio station produced and aired radio dramas targeting Pakhtoon population that resides in Northwestern province of Pakistan. The Pakhtoon population traditionally lives in the tribal setup; they lag in terms of socio- economic and political development. These dramas were aimed at creating awareness about health and bringing positive changes in social behavior and general well-being of the targeted population. This paper presents a discourse analysis of radio dramas. The study attempts to determine whether the dramas’ scripts adhere to any theoretical framework of the EE or health campaigns strategies? Other questions addressed by the authors include: What messages were included in the radio broadcasts analyzed? Was the production process based on any theoretical foundation? What themes were developed in the radio broadcasts analyzed? What types of char
5) 37 The Tribal Areas under the Administration of the West Pakistan Province
Author(s):Asma Gul Jinnah College for Women University of Peshawar, Peshawar, Pakistan & Syed Minhaj-ul-Hassan Department of History University of Peshawar, Peshawar, Pakistan

Abstract :

Tribal Areas of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan (FATA, PATA and Frontier Region) are now-a-days under focus in national and international geo-political strategies. To avoid any future disturbance in the region after Pakistan army’s operation Zarb-e-Azb, suggestions are circulating of amalgamating this region with the province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa or creating a new province comprising of the said areas. But very few of us know that in the past it remained part of a province which was the province of West Pakistan (1955-1970) comprised of all the territories of today’s Pakistan. The Province of West Pakistan, for administrative purpose, was divided into Divisions. The former province of North-West Frontier was comprised of two Divisions: Peshawar and Dera Ismail Khan under the charge of Commissioners. At the dissolution of West Pakistan Province (March 1970) three provinces of the region were reinstated and Balochistan was created as a full-fledged province as well and only the Tribal Area of North West was returned to the Federal authority.
6) Effect of Operation Neptune Spear on Anti-Americanism in Mainstream Pakistani Press
Author(s):Bakht Rawan Department of Mass Communication Allama Iqbal Open University, Islamabad, Pakistan

Abstract :

This study analyses anti-Americanism in the mainstream press of Pakistan before and after the Operation Neptune Spear (ONS) also called Abbottabad Operation conducted by US forces in Abbottabad (Pakistan) in which Osama bin Laden (OBL) was killed. The researcher analysed coverage of drone attacks and Abbottabad Operation in op-ed pages of four leading national newspapers i.e., Dawn, The News, Nawa-i-Waqt, and Express. Total time of the study was four months, two months before the Operation (01 March 2011 to 30 April 2011) and two months after the Operation (01 May 2011 to 30 June 2011). The ONS was taken as an independent variable for exploring anti-Americanism in the mainstream Pakistani media (print media) while “drone attacks” was taken as a control variable. Anti-Americanism in op-ed pages of the selected newspapers was compared to determine the effect of ONS on anti-Americanism in the mainstream Urdu and English press of Pakistan. The results revealed that US image in the Pakistani press remained negative throughout the study period and the ONS had no significant effect on the image of USA in Pakistani leading press.
7) Quality Enhancement Cell and its Effectiveness: Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Universities’ Teachers and Students’ Perceptions and Expectations
Author(s):Muhammad Naeem Butt Institute of Education and Research University of Peshawar, Peshawar, Pakistan Romina Mansoor Institute of Education and Research Kohat University of Science and Technology, K

Abstract :

The study encompassed perceptions and expectations of teachers and students regarding the efficacy of Quality Enhancement Cells (QECs) in 07 public sector universities of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. The effectiveness of QECs was analyzed on 09 domains, standard criteria, set by HEC. The sample of the study comprised 105 teachers and 105 students selected through simple random sampling technique. Two closed-ended questionnaires were constructed consisting 34 question items, with same essence, one each for students and teachers. Gamma correlation coefficient technique was employed to analyze the data. The results of University of Peshawar revealed that QEC required improvement in the domains of implementation of plans, teachers’ evaluation by students, weaknesses rectified, and corrective actions taken by university, course evaluation and teaching department’s interaction with teachers regarding their evaluation and internal evaluation of teachers’ performance. The University of Agriculture Peshawar, UET Peshawar and UST Bannu did not achieve the required standards in any of the 09 domains. Results further elicited that QECs of Islamia College University Peshawar, Gomal University D.I. Khan and Kohat University of Science and Technology did not address the domains of membership of international bodies, participation of students in international events and external evaluation of teachers’ performance. The performance of QECs was not satisfactory in the selected universities.
8) 73 The Mariner’s Centre of Gravity: The Self
Author(s):Mustaq ur Rehman Department of English Gomal University D.I. Khan, Pakistan Syed Zahid Ali Shah Islamia College University Peshawar, Pakistan & Samina Ashfaq College of Home Economics Univers

Abstract :

Modern day selfishness and senselessness has imperatively necessitated the quest for the true “Self.” Bereft of his true identity in the confused milieu of modern times, man frantically searches for a perennial culture of which he was mythically a part and where he was firmly rooted. The search is not external but rather internal; it is to be carried out within the inner recesses of mind and not in the external social life; it does not relate to human life in social progress but in his archetypal realities that are the cornerstones of eternal human psyche. With us today it is the internal world that is desolate and uninhabited. The strong desire, which was once with the man of yore to gather ourselves into the interiority of a rare world of values and convictions, has given way to the uncertain preoccupations of which we hardly feel ourselves as part. The Mariner’s story in Coleridge’s “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” relates a similar account that can be accounted for Man’s eternal quest for wholeness.
9) Economic Analysis of Moonlighting in Higher Education Institutes of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
Author(s):Noor Jehan PhD Scholar, Institute of Development Studies University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan & Himayatullah Khan Institute of Development Studies University of Agriculture, Peshawar, P

Abstract :

The main objective of this study is to investigate the determinants of moonlighting in public sector universities of KP. A multi-staged sampling was used for data collection. In the first stage, the population was stratified into rural, semi-urban and urban universities and 9 universities were purposively selected. In the second stage, in each selected university teaching faculty was further stratified into Professors, Associate Professors, Assistant Professors, Lecturers and Teaching Assistants. In the third stage, a sample of 656 faculty members was selected using simple random sampling and proportional allocation method. Binary Logistic regression model was used as the dependent variable was of dichotomous nature (moonlighting vs. no moonlighting). Wage rate of second job, accumulative wage of more than one second jobs, employment status and cadre, hours of work at second job, location and marital status were found significant in determining moonlighting. Based on its findings, the study recommended that moonlighting may be encouraged which may not only enhance moonlighter’s income but also their efficiency. The study also recommended that studies on moonlighting in other sectors may also be conducted which could help policy planners, researchers and other stack holders.
10) Coleridge’s Albatross: The Wider Contexts of Relevance1
Author(s):Syed Zahid Ali Shah Department of English Islamia College University, Peshawar, Pakistan & Nasir Jamal Khattak Department of English & Applied Linguistics University of Peshawar, Pakistan

Abstract :

This paper focuses on the symbolic significance of the Mariner’s brutal act of killing the unsuspecting innocent Albatross for reasons and motives that are even unknown to the former and relate this significant episode to issues that are individual and collective prevailing over the whole spectrum of life. This argument will also bring into spotlight the Albatross symbol that has been variously interpreted, with diverse dimensions, over the years. The main purpose is to shed light on the individual-social paradigm in the heavily loaded atmosphere of the ballad poem.
11) Burnt Shadows: “Home”, “Cosmopolitanism” and “Hybridization”
Author(s):Shazia Babar Jinnah College for Women University of Peshawar, Pakistan

Abstract :

Multi-cultural societies, according to the cultural theorist Homi Bhabha, are in the process of developing hybrid identities that are in a state of flux. Shamsie’s Burnt Shadows reflects an individual who retains a strong link with the past but also develops in the future. For the protagonist displacement and loss is an on-going process yet is a living example of a person who can adjust in varied cultures. In contrast Raza the cosmopolitan, with a fluid identity has the capacity to form a new identity from diverse cultural sources. Bhabha’s concept of cultural identity provides the backdrop for the reader to reach an understanding of identity.
12) Regional Interference in Afghanistan and its Implications for Regional Peace and Security
Author(s):Tehseena Usman Department of Regional Studies University of Peshawar, Peshawar, Pakistan Nasreen Ghufran Department of International Relation University of Peshawar, Peshawar, Pakistan & Minhas

Abstract :

Owing to Afghanistan’s geostrategic location, diverse ethnic composition, decentralized governance and socio-political structure, outside interference has been a historical phenomenon. However, 1978 can be treated as a watershed which changed the entire dynamics and context of foreign interference in the country. The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan triggered by global power politics and developments subsequent to Soviet forces withdrawal in 1989, accentuated prospects of competition among regional players. The extreme rivalry proved to be self-defeating for regional countries as their policies were not well grounded. The covert manipulation of Afghan policies by regional countries together with Afghans own internal divisions and divergent interests have had serious repercussions for Afghanistan’s stability and that of the region as a whole. Most importantly none of the regional players have managed to achieve their self-defined objectives in Afghanistan. The dire instability and insecurity has deprived all the regional countries of economic dividends and development. The paper suggests that the self-interests of each of the regional countries would be best served through collaboration and problem-solving approach. This would demand more nuanced focus on shared interests, cooperation and a broad common vision that would promote an atmosphere of mutual trust and confidence. This article attempts to highlight the regional interference in Afghanistan and its implications for r
13) The Inflation–Output Nexus: Empirical Evidence from Pakistan, Indonesia and Iran
Author(s):Saira Rasul School of Economics Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan Himayatullah Khan Institute of Development Studies University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan & Arshad Ali Bhatti

Abstract :

This paper observes the dynamic associations among inflation, output growth for Pakistan, Indonesia and Iran with their uncertainties. We use various GARCH models to estimate the conditional variances that are used as proxies for creating uncertainties of output growth and inflation. Finally, we use bi-variate ARMA (p,q)-GARCH-M (1,1) models with diagonal BEKK specification to find the twelve causal relationships between inflation, its uncertainty vs output growth with its uncertainty. Our evidence supports numeral of important conclusions. Firstly, we find that Friedman (1977) hypothesis, i.e., inflation clues to increase the uncertainty of inflation, which is not supported in both Pakistan and Iran but not for Indonesia. Secondly, Cukierman-Meltzer (1986) hypothesis is accepted in Pakistan and Holland (1995) hypothesis is accepted in Indonesia and Iran. Thirdly, Black (1987) hypothesis is accepted in Pakistan and Iran whereas, Deveraux (1989) hypothesis is accepted in Indonesia. We also discover that higher output growth causes to reduce the inflation in both Pakistan plus Indonesia. Higher inflation reduces output growth in both Pakistan and Indonesia but not in Iran. We also conclude that the policy makers of these countries may take measures to reduce inflation rate because output growth is inversely linked with inflation and the prevailing uncertainty in the economy.

Volume No. XXIV

Issue No. 2

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