The Journal of Humanities & Social Sciences

1) Volume XXV, No 1, 2017
Author(s):Editor Nasir Jamal Khattak, PhD (Amherst) Department of English & Applied Linguistics University of Peshawar Office Secretary Muhammad Altaf

Abstract :

Guidelines for Contributors The Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Peshawar, a peer-reviewed journal, invites papers in the field of social sciences, humanities, business and management, and journalism. Manuscripts (a softcopy on a CD, and two double-spaced hardcopies) should not exceed 7000 words (including endnotes and references) with an informative abstract (250 words maximum), and a crossed cheque of Rs. 3000 (Pak Rupees three thousand only; non-refundable) payable to “the Editor, JHSS.” They should be composed in MS Word, Times New Roman, and Font Size 12. Figures, tables, graphs (if any) should not be out of the margins of the text of the paper. Quotations in languages other than English must be translated in the body of the paper, and accompanied by the original in the endnotes. The author’s name, title/designation, e-mail and mailing addresses and institutional affiliation should appear on a separate title page. It is also important that you carefully proofread your paper, and that it is accompanied by a Turnitin similarity index report in soft form. JHSS will also check submissions for plagiarism. The Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences consider one single-authored (as principle author) and one co-authored (must not exceed two) by the same author for publication per number. The Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences follows a variant of APA/MLA styles to accommodate the multi-disciplinarian work that the journal features. Refe
2) THE JOURNAL OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Author(s):Editor Nasir Jamal Khattak, PhD (Amherst)

Abstract :

The Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences (JHSS), a refereed and internationally indexed journal recognised by the HEC, is published biannually by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, University of Peshawar, with the approval of the competent authority. No part of the material published in this journal be reproduced, reprinted, or copied without the prior permission of the editor.
3) A Fusion of Educational Research and Fuzzy Information: A Pragmatic Approach
Author(s):Muhammad Naeem Butt Institute of Education & Research University of Peshawar, Peshawar, Pakistan & Muhammad Shafiq Institute of Numerical Sciences Kohat University of Science & Technology, Kohat

Abstract :

Results and recommendations, based on data interpretation, in the research of social sciences are generated on precise measurements. However, advancement of numerical sciences showcases the unattainability of precise measurement of continuous phenomena due to the recent conception of fuzziness. Measurement results establish through educational research are obtained mostly by employing classroom experiments, survey-questionnaires and/or standardized-questionnaire; whereas, available literature also suggests the occurrence of fuzziness in classical measurement and questionnaire responses instead of preciseness. Therefore, in educational research it is recommended to employ latest measurement technique, i.e. fuzzy numbers instead of precise numbers, which will authenticate the reliability and appropriateness of obtained results.
4) How Can Pakistan Improve its Rising External Debt Situations?
Author(s):Asif Farid Assistant Chief (World Trade Organization) Ministry of Commerce, Islamabad, Pakistan

Abstract :

This study is an attempt to investigate the role of poverty reduction, income inequality and trade openness in the improvement of external debt situations in Pakistan over the period 1973-2013. ARDL approach has been used to examine relationship among the variables. The results confirm that poverty, inequality, trade openness and unemployment have relationship with external debt in the long-run. However, found no causal relationship between external debt and income inequality, between external debt and unemployment in the short run. The study observes that openness is not favorable in Pakistan context. Reduction in poverty and inequality will increase the possibility of Pakistan entering a virtuous cycle of high growth and sustainable socio-economic development which ultimately will improve external debt situations.
5) Teaching Poetry: Impact of Teacher’s Non-Verbal Communication on Students’ Learning Outcomes
Author(s):Muhammad Naeem Butt Institute of Education & Research University of Peshawar, Peshawar, Pakistan & Muhammad Shafiq Institute of Numerical Sciences Kohat University of Science & Technology, Kohat

Abstract :

This experimental study considers the impact of non-verbal communication on the learning achievement of students of class 10th. This study highlights the importance of non-verbal communication in teaching of poetry in the subject of English. The study discusses the research questions of how teacher’s notion of medium of instruction might enhance the teaching of English poetry and what type of learning is possible with the incorporation of prosodic features? Population of the study comprises the selected school in urban area of Peshawar (North-West of Pakistan). Experiment in the actual classroom setting was conducted in the sampled school. The significant difference between pre-and post-tests of the control and experimental groups was tested through paired t-test. Results revealed that teachers created active learning environment through their non-verbal gestures; whereby students were attentive in the classrooms and actively participated in the learning process, which consequently enhanced the level of their retention and understanding. Use of non-verbal communication helped the teacher to provide better understanding to the students in their learning achievement. On the contrary teacher who did not use non-verbal communication in the classroom could not motivate the students for effective learning.
6) 37 Liberalization of Media in Pakistan: A Challenge to Democracy
Author(s):Mehnaz Gul, Zia Obaid Institute of Management Studies University of Peshawar, Peshawar, Pakistan & Shahid Ali Institute of Management Sciences Peshawar, Pakistan

Abstract :

Pakistan’s electronic media has been under state control for five decades. The state had monopoly over television and radiobroadcasting, thus a gatekeeper controlling the information flow. However, in 2002, media was liberalized under the dictatorial regime of General Pervez Musharraf. This was against the popular belief that democratic regimes have media liberalization policy while it is in the interest of dictators to put stringent control over media. This study is an attempt to consider the reasons for this liberalization of media and to evaluate its impact on the socio economic and political environment of the country. The study follows the political economy methodology and analyzes the findings collected through secondary data, under the overarching theory of political economy of communication. Pakistan adopted liberal and deregulated policies because of the popular economic model based on neo liberal agenda of developed nations on whom it was dependent for aid and assistance. However, the liberalization of media does not only bring the overall economic growth but also the problems associated with liberalization. The media in Pakistan saw a boom in the market, where in one-decade television channels increased drastically from three to ninety, simultaneously giving birth to the five big media moguls who own major media outlets. This concentration of ownership brought in the problems of unequal distribution of wealth, class disparities, uninformed citizenry, commodificat
7) The Role of Civil Bureaucracy—Facilitative or Regressive? Perspectives from Pakistan
Author(s):Aamer Taj Institute of Management Sciences Peshawar, Pakistan

Abstract :

This paper explores some of the theoretical limitations of classical theory of bureaucracy. It also analyses Pakistani bureaucracy’s organisational composition and behaviour which reveals that the Pakistan’s civil administrative structure is incongruent with the principles indoctrinated in the classical theory of bureaucracy postulated by Max Webber. When the civil bureaucracy of a state trespasses into the domain of other institutions including the political ones, the very character of the civil administration becomes politicised and this phenomenon is evident in the case of Pakistan. Likewise, the civil administrative institutions are routinely pressurised for manipulating and twisting their rule-bound operating procedures in accordance with the vested interests of politicians. This makes the politicisation of administration inevitable and the concept of ‘legal rational authority’, a highly idealised principle. The organisational and institutional analysis of Pakistan’s civil bureaucracy illustrates that it is a poor materialisation of the classical model of bureaucracy mainly because this system of administration was inherited from the epoch of colonial rule and as such it was never a manifestation of the theory of bureaucracy in the first place.
8) We Are What We Eat In A House for Mr Biswas and the Inheritance of Loss1
Author(s):Najma Saher Government Home Economics College Pirpai, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan & Shazia Sadaf Department of English & Applied Linguistics University of Peshawar, Peshawar, Pakistan

Abstract :

In The Inheritance of Loss and A House for Mr. Biswas, food might be recognized as an all-important metaphor for self-identification. Food is loaded with meaning about relations, communion, home and identity. In the said texts, food becomes a powerful voice for an emptiness which lives on as a physical craving and a continual sense of discomfort. Identity seems to become physical and instinctive when it comes to food. Interestingly in the postcolonial moment, food appears to lose its capacity for gratification and either acts as a catalyst for evoking disappointment, or a metaphor for self-estrangement that is usually experienced by the displaced subject. This paper aims to show the effects of colonization on the characters’ eating habits and their struggle at dining table and around kitchen. The native is lured into preferring western food over local cuisine so as to cover his colonial inadequacy but most often get deprived of the food that has been satisfying both to his palate and his stomach.
9) An Alchemical Exposition of “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”1
Author(s):Syed Zahid Ali Shah Islamia College University Peshawar, Pakistan

Abstract :

In its essence, alchemy strives to arrive at a harmonious synthesis of the contending opposites. The maxim “Dissolve and coagulate” encompasses in its precision not only Jung’s extensive alchemical deliberations but also Coleridge’s theoretical formulations on “Imagination.” A conceptual belief in life’s struggle towards unification and coherence is seen in Jung and Coleridge both as the outcome of an intense struggle of conflicting and contending mental and psychological processes in the background. The chaos of contending tendencies, followed by an analysis in isolation of these opposing forces, and a final resolution into harmony is what alchemy proceeds with. This paper is an analysis of how these opposing and conflicting tendencies, psychologically and alchemically, are resulting in a wholeness through the symbolic cluster of “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”.
10) Can Working Capital Cycle or Cash Conversion Cycle be Factored in Economic Performance of Pakistani Corporate Firms?
Author(s):Shahid Ali, Atta Ur Rahman Institute of Management Sciences Peshawar, Pakistan & Zia Obaid Institute of Management Studies University of Peshawar, Peshawar, Pakistan

Abstract :

This study works to examine the working capital factors that may enhance economic performance of corporate firms in Pakistan. This performance is measured by sales and accounts payable in days, accounts receivable in days, inventory turnover in days and cash conversion cycle represents working capital. The study is conducted on 64 non-financial firms listed on Karachi stock Exchange for a period of 12 years, from 2003 to 2014. Account receivables and payables along with cash conversion cycle have significant positive relationship with performance of firms. Inventory turnover has a significant negative relationship with sales. The result of this study shows that the role of managing working capital is vital for firms. If account receivable in days and accounts payable in days are increased, it will lead to increased sales of the firms. The study shows that if management can master the art of efficiently managing the working capital and keep it at optimum level, they will enhance the economic performance of the firm.
11) Political Clientelism—Beyond the Public Choice Explanation
Author(s):Aamer Taj, Fahad Abdullah, & Shahwali Khan Institute of Management Sciences Peshawar, Pakistan

Abstract :

This paper explores the theoretical perspectives and dynamics of voter-politician relationships, the determinants of voting behaviours and the parameters of electoral mechanisms in local governance with specific reference to the post-colonial societies in developing countries. The discussion begins with the distinguishing clientelism from other phenomena like corruption and pork barrel politics with specific reference to local governance. The impact of patronage employment and socio-economic fragmentation on the outcomes of pork barrel politics is evaluated in order to assess the dynamics of voting patterns. In addition, the paper also includes a discourse based on arguments that run counter to the public choice explanation of clientelistic exchanges. The identification of these antithetical stances to public choice theory will reveal why various forms of clientelism in certain societies make the overnight paradigm shift to a new form of political organisation, extremely complex.

Volume No. XXV No.1

Issue No. 1

No.1